Fallen trees and lost water


times of malta

Fallen trees and lost water

Alfred E. Baldacchino

Following the weekend thunderstorm, Monday 7th October dawned with broken trees, overflowing sewers and rivulets taking hold of sensitive traffic areas. This is just a harbinger of things to come every time it rains, let alone when it rains cats and dogs.

one-stemtree

Heavy crown on one single thin stalk

I drove by a tree which had succumbed to bouts of wind. Half of a fully mature 50 year old three-storey high ficus tree, on the periphery of a small grove, lay on its side. Unprofessional pruning contributed to its downfall. The size of its crown was too heavy for its long thin bare stalk. The remaining half of the tree displayed a top-heavy crown on a similar long thin stalk, possibly saved by the support of surrounding trees. If only the country had a Minister responsible for landscaping who had a vision backed up by professional experts to advise him on professional pruning and landscaping, such loss of trees would not occur. But there is not, and there never was any such Minister, except on paper.

I was hindered from approaching the tree by two rivulets, one on each side of the road, running towards Valley Road, Birkirkara. A couple of meters up the road, a manhole silently tried to outdo the dancing fountains at St. George’s square Valletta. Except that the water was coloured and it did not rely on electricity. I craved for a clothes peg to withstand the stench.

If only the country had a minister with a vision of how to manage and store the scarce natural resource that is water. But there is not, and there never was any such minister. Indeed, there was a day in the political life of this counlry when one incumbent found it difficult to distinguish between a water culvert and a sewer.

The damage done by the storm is the price of the lack of political vision, verging on laissez faire, and short-tenn decisions and mismanagement. Structures which allow the harvesting of rain water are not made use of. Age-old legislation is hardly ever enforced to the extent that following amendments to the law, it became the rule of thumb to channel collected rain water into the street. Compliance certificates are still being issued for buildings that allow rainwater to pour into the sewers.

If only the country had a minister with a vision of how to manage and store the scarce natural resource that is water.

But political ‘wisdom’ has come to the rescue. In a €52 million project, subsidised by EU funds, an underground tunnel has been excavated to channel ‘flood water’ from tha streets to the sea – sewage and all.

eu-bill-board

High and dry – the bill board advertising the EU sponsorship of the National Flood Relief Project

This ‘flood’ relief tunnel, that is, if it works as planned, will take away the pure rainwater and prevent It from replenishing the water table. This is not harvested either, but with politcal blessing is channelled to the streets, or to the sewers, from where it will burst out in fountains.

Mingled with the sewage, it will than flow again and run through the streets, hopefully directed to this ‘flood’ relief tunnel to be eventually channelled to the sea. Problem solved? Not exactly. It will be pumped up again by energy-consuming distillers to be channelled back to our taps.

Afer taking a photo or two of the broken tree and the spontaneous manhole-fountain, I returned home. I still needed the clothes peg.

 

sewer-rivulets.

Hours after it stopped raining, some manholes were still emptying their contents adding to rivulets running  along the streets.

Driving through such rivulets was Hobson’s choice, as other drivers wera constrained to do, washed and sprayed with sewage water in the process. Back home I had to wash the wheels and mudguards of the car to take away the stench. If only we had a minister responsible for health. We do not. We never did, because up to a decade or so ago, there was no need to see to such street health hazards.

The lack of political will, vision and professional management of natural resources, all with consequences paid for by society and biodiversity, are being passed from one political incumbent to his successor. The present vision is like one expounded by a blindfold poliltician walking through a tunnel in pitch darkness accompanied by his tall-wagging environmental watchdog trusted with planning and management. And during this long walk in the dark, in their efforts to manage natural resources, man and watchdog are happily engulfed by a concoction of rain water and sewage.

dogsilhouette

The indigenous political vison of managing natural resources, such as water.

This picture will get worse before it dawns. In the meantime, children are sponsored to catch a drop, while the EU provides politicians with millions to throw gallons into the sea!

 

aebaldacchino@gmail.com

Other related articles:

X’qed nagħmluy bl-ilma tax-xita   http://wp.me/pL6Mk-IG   

An official water policy!   http://wp.me/pL6Mk-ag

Water harvesting culture   http://wp.me/pL6Mk-FB

When valuable rain sets in   http://wp.me/pL6Mk-FB

A vision buried at Nadur Cemetery  http://wp.me/pL6Mk-sb

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

One Response to Fallen trees and lost water

  1. gaucivincent says:

    Let me quote what an FAO expert team had to say in 2006 on the local water challenge: “Malta’s core water challenge is one of water governance.”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: